Salary Employee

7 Important Things to Know About FLSA Compensation Requirements for a Salaried Employee

General Rule About Deductions From Full Salary Amount

In addition to meeting certain duties tests, to qualify for exemption from Federal Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) overtime pay under the Regulations, Part 541, generally an employee must be paid at a rate of not less than $455 per week on a salary basis. As a general rule, if the exempt employee performs any work during the workweek, he or she must be paid the full salary amount. An employer may not make deductions from an exempt employee’s pay for absences caused by the employer or by the operating requirements of the business. If the exempt employee is ready, willing and able to work, an employer cannot make deductions from the exempt employee’s pay when no work is available.

To qualify for exemption from overtime pay, employees generally must meet certain tests regarding their job duties and meet certain compensation requirements. Job titles do not determine exempt status. Instead the exemption is determined by the specific job duties the employee performs in the business of his employer.

1.) Are any deductions from pay allowed for the salaried employee? 

Deductions from pay are allowed:

  • When an employee is absent from work for one or more full days for personal reasons other than sickness or disability;
  • For absences of one or more full days due to sickness or disability if the deduction is made in accordance with a bona fide plan, policy or practice of providing compensation for salary lost due to illness;
  • To offset amounts employees receive as jury or witness fees, or for temporary military duty pay;
  • For penalties imposed in good faith for infractions of safety rules of major significance;
  • For unpaid disciplinary suspensions of one or more full days imposed in good faith for workplace conduct rule infractions;
  • In the employee’s initial or terminal week of employment if the employee does not work the full week, or
  • For unpaid leave taken by the employee under the Federal Family and Medical Leave Act.

2.) What kinds of deductions are not allowed?

Deductions for partial day absences generally violate the salary basis rule, except those occurring in the first or final week of an exempt employee’s employment or for unpaid leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act. If an exempt employee is absent for one and one-half days for personal reasons, the employer may only deduct for the one full-day absence. The exempt employee must receive a full day’s pay for the partial day worked.

3.) What are some other examples of improper deductions include:

  • A deduction of a day’s pay because the employer was closed due to inclement weather;
  • A deduction of three days pay because the exempt employee was absent for jury duty;
  • A deduction for a two-day absence due to a minor illness when the employer does not have a bona fide sick leave plan, policy or practice of providing wage replacement benefits; and
  • A deduction for a partial day absence to attend a parent-teacher conference.

4.) What is the effect of isolated or inadvertent improper deductions?

Improper deductions that are either isolated or inadvertent will not violate the salary basis rule for any employees whose pay had been subject to the improper deductions, provided that the employer reimburses the employees for the improper deductions.

5.) What if the improper deductions are not isolated or inadvertent?

If an employer has an actual practice of making improper deductions from employees’ pay (as opposed to isolated or inadvertent improper deductions), the salary basis rule will not be met during the time period in which the improper deductions were made for employees in the same job classification working for the same manager(s) responsible for the actual improper deductions. Therefore, the affected employees will not have been paid on a salary basis as required for exemption during that time period.

6.) How do you distinguish between isolated or inadvertent improper deductions and an actual practice of making improper deductions?

An actual practice of making improper deductions demonstrates that the employer did not intend to pay employees on a salary basis. The factors to consider when determining whether an employer has an actual practice of making improper deductions include, but are not limited to:

  • The number of improper deductions, particularly as compared to the number of employee infractions warranting discipline;
  • The time period during which the employer made improper deductions;
  • The number and geographic location of employees whose salary was improperly reduced;
  • The number and geographic location of managers responsible for taking the improper deductions; and
  • Whether the employer has a clearly communicated policy permitting or prohibiting improper deductions.

If an employer has a clearly communicated policy that prohibits the improper pay deductions that includes a complaint mechanism, reimburses employees for any improper deductions and makes a good faith commitment to comply in the future, the salary basis of pay will not be violated unless the employer willfully violates the policy by continuing to make improper deductions after receiving employee complaints.

7.) What if the employer does not reimburse the employee for the deductions?

If the facts show that the employer has an actual practice of making improper deductions and the employer fails to reimburse employees for any improper deductions or continues to make improper deductions after receiving employee complaints, the salary basis rule is not met and the exemption is lost during the time period in which the improper deductions were made for employees in the same job classification working for the same manager(s) responsible for the actual improper deductions.

The determination of whether improper compensation deductions have occurred in any circumstance is best made by an experienced attorney. Call attorney Rose H. Robbins at (954) 946-8130 for a FREE  telephone consultation about your claim for minimum wage or unpaid overtime wage violations. Or you can complete the simple form below for confidential submission to our office.  Please be advised that by merely submitting this form, no Attorney-Client relationship is formed with this law firm.   You must provide your name,  home or cell phone number, your email address and your zip code in the form.  We serve the following counties: Broward, Highlands, Indian River, Martin, Miami-Dade, Monroe, Okeechobee, Palm Beach, and St. Lucie.

 

 

 

Salary Alone Does Not Determine Exemption From Overtime Pay

Neither a job title or salary alone determines exempt status from overtime pay. The Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) requires that most employees in the United States be paid at least the federal minimum wage for all hours worked and overtime pay at time and one-half the regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 hours in a workweek.

Call attorney Rose H. Robbins at (954) 946-8130 for a FREE  telephone consultation about your claim for minimum wage or unpaid overtime wage violations.

When does pay for compensable time become mandatory? For “white collar” employees, the FLSA does provide an exemption from both minimum wage and overtime pay for bona fide executive, administrative, professional and outside sales employee as well as certain computer employees.  To qualify for this exemption, employees generally must meet certain tests based on their job duties and be paid on a salary basis at not less than $455 per week.   The application of these tests to specific cases has been developed by the cases fought out in Courts. A Florida lawyer experienced in wage and hour litigation should analyze your particular job situation to find out if your FLSA rights have been violated and you are owed minimum or overtime wages.

However, these  “white collar” exemptions from overtime and minimum wages do not apply to manual laborers or other “blue collar” workers who perform work involving repetitive operations with their hands, physical skill and energy.  FLSA-covered, non-management employees in production, maintenance, construction and similar occupations such as carpenters, electricians, mechanics, plumbers, iron workers, craftsmen, operating engineers, longshoremen, construction workers and laborers are entitled to minimum wage and overtime premium pay under the FLSA, and generally are not exempt no matter how highly paid they might be.

Call attorney Rose H. Robbins at (954) 946-8130 for a FREE  telephone consultation about your claim for minimum wage or unpaid overtime wage violations. Or you can complete the simple form below for confidential submission to our office.  Please be advised that by merely submitting this form, no Attorney-Client relationship is formed with this law firm.   You must provide your name,  home or cell phone number, your email address and your zip code in the form.  We serve the following counties: Broward, Highlands, Indian River, Martin, Miami-Dade, Monroe, Okeechobee, Palm Beach, and St. Lucie